Alabama rot

What is Alabama Rot?

CRGV, commonly known as "Alabama Rot" is a disease that has no known cause and can affect all dogs, irrelevant of breed, age or weight.

Unfortunately cases of Alabama Rot (CRGV) not spotted early can lead to sudden and potentially fatal kidney failure.

Spotting Alabama Rot?

* Skin Lesions

These appear as distinct swelling, a patch of red skin or open and ulcer like.

* Skin Sores

Skin sores not caused by any known injury, commonly found below the elbow or knee.

* Kidney Failure

Within 2-7 Days outward signs of kidney failure; vomiting, reduced hunger and unusual tiredness.

Prevention!

There is no vaccination and no certain way  of preventing your dog contracting the disease.

Knowing the warning signs can help you in seeking veterinary treatment QUICKLY.

It is thought the disease is picked up on the paws and legs on muddy walks, so please:

WASH PADS AND LEGS AFTER WOODLAND WALKS OR EVERY WALK IN AFFECTED AREAS

CHECK FOR SIGNS OF CRGV

IF IN DOUBT CALL YOUR VET

Vets4pets Website

The Vets4Pets website has a good bit of information and a map to detail areas affected by Alabama Rot.

Please visit it here:

http://www.vets4pets.com/stop-alabama-rot/

Chocolate Toxicity

Having learnt from our own lovely trio that if they want to - even the best behaved dog will open an easter egg box we now religiously keep our easter eggs up high when we aren't eating them of course! Supervise children eating chocolate around your dogs and if the worst happens if in doubt contact your vet :)

Why is Chocolate toxic to dogs?

Chocolate contains a chemical named Theobromine, this chemical is classed as TOXIC to dogs because they are not able to metabolise this chemical which can prove fatal.

What can happen?

Chocolate poisoning mainly affects the heart, central nervous system and kidneys and usually occurs between 4-24hrs after your dog has eaten chocolate.

The effects will depend on a few factors, the amount eaten, type of chocolate eaten and the size of the dog.

The main signs to look out for are:

Vomit (this may include blood)

Diarrhoea

Restlesness and Hyperactivity

Rapid Breathing

Muscle Tension, Incordination

Increased Heart Rate

Seizures

What should you do if they've eaten chocolate?

It can be really hard to tell the exact amount of chocolate your dog may have eaten.  If you are concerned the best thing to do is contact your vet for advice.

You can use the handy calculator at the header to give yourself an idea of the effects this may have on your dog based on their size and the type of chocolate they have eaten.

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Langford Road, Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, SG18 9RA

Licence Holder: Mrs G Gray

Licence Number: CB/LANW/16/061529

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